How To Reach Your Writing Goals Like A Pro: A Step by Step Guide to becoming a Self-Published Author

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Disclaimer: I read this book with the intent of writing this blog post as part of a marketing campaign by M.C. Simon. (While not a paid promotion, the book was provided free for review.)

This is the second book in M.C. Simons series named “How To Master Your Life (Book 2)”. The first book “Feng Shui For Writers” didn’t match my taste, as I don’t dabble in such matters.

How To Reach Your Writing Goals Like A Pro: A Step by Step Guide to becoming a Self-Published Author contains less religious matters. This book contains a fully fleshed out path for even those of us that aren’t that religious. There is a taste of “The secret” in some parts of the book, but if you read lightly, you will get a lot out of the book.

I currently write 10k words a day as a part of my nanowrimo challenge. (Yes 300 000 words, it’s a thing.)

If you want an easy to follow step by step guide to clear your mind, get that reading done, find those priorities and finally, publish a book. The book is chock-full of tips and tricks. to get you going, and keep you going. I am certainly going to re-read this book.

The book can be had over at Amazon. M.C. Simon also has a website over at mcsimonwrites.com Alternatively, you could turn your eyeballs towards this press release which I was also given as press material 🙂

Review: The Name of the Wind – Patrick Rothfuss

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The setup for this book, is that a storyteller appears, and wants to hear the story of the protagonist.  Who as it is, has become a bartender.

As it is a story within a story-setup, the book takes a little while to get going. But don’t let that chase you away. The story is soon told, and when that happens you’re stuck with this book. It’ll pull you in, and keep you there much longer than you intend. And that, is the power of a good book.

The book tells the story of a young child, that learns of a world where names carry a lot of weight. There are other powerful magical systems as well, but the names are alpha omega.

I liked this book, and can recommend this book to anyone that loves magic. The book may start out slow, but it will continue fast.

Book Review: Feng Shui For Writers by M.C. Simon

Firstly a disclaimer: I read this book with the intent of writing this blog post as part of a marketing campaign by M.C. Simon. (While not a paid promotion, the book was provided free for review.)

Secondly a review:  I don’t particularly subscribe to the idea of feng shui. It just doesn’t jam with my world view. Mostly I subscribe to the scientific world view, the one where we can’t really say that feng shui has any basis upon other things than subjective experience. That said I did get something out of this book: Your environment plays a big role in how you end up writing.

I also got an idea. Now, ideas are dime a dozen. They’re generally cheap. Those that pay themselves, are the ideas that are immediately implemented or ideas where a white plastic apple is glued to something of mediocre ingenuity.

No white plastic apples were involved with my idea. I decided to change my writing environment. For comparison, here is my earlier writing environment (Yes, I really had a video of that lying around. Because people wondered how I wrote as many words as I do 😉 ):

The book goes into some detail on the neatness of your desk, so that was one of the first things to go, I uncluttered my desktop (not the computer one, but my real one). Then I removed some cables on the wall, they’re still there, just hidden behind my screens. After that I moved a picture that I loved, this picture has decayed. A part of the reason for that is that it was stored outside for a month or so (before I made it mine).

I found it outside, and I love it for all its imperfections. M.C. Simon advice you to hang a picture that inspires you, however also says that they should be of water or dynamic nature. This one is of a church. But also a river, and some vegetation. The focal point is that it inspires me.

The third change, is one I haven’t implemented yet, but I have most of the tools for it. Assuming I will go ahead with it. The author propose separating yourself from the rest of your world at home. In my case, I have a bunch of black fabric, that I think would do well to hide myself from the world. To make an even more separated “safe-zone” than the two screens that makes up my left and right fields of view.

The second comparison video (Pause is your friend xD If you want to use my “screensavers” find them at writing.faps.me ):

Notice the shot-glass, I don’t think I’ll use it. But it IS cute.

If you need a careful prod, something to get you to look at your environment. Maybe change a few things… EVEN if you don’t subscribe to feng shui (especially if you do), M.C. Simon provides a bunch of tips to make a writing zone your own.

The book can be had over at Amazon. M.C. Simon also has a website over at mcsimonwrites.com Alternatively, you could turn your eyeballs towards this press release which I was also given as press material 🙂

Deadhouse Gates ~ Steven Erikson

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Deadhouse Gates is a novel written in the fashion we’ve grown to know Steven Erikson for. You take a bookverse, then add characters. All those characters have their own ambitions, they have their own plots, feelings, backstory… You know the whole deal. But the thing about Eriksons Fall of the Malazan empire-series (haven’t read his other books) is that you take a plot, and use that plot as a guide. Then you take other plots, and make yourself a silk weave.

‘yknow, because that’s what you do with stories, you make the finest of cloths so you can wear it and people will wonder what the hell your new clothes are made out of.

Enough with the analogies. Steven writes in a weaving path that takes you through the viewpoints of many men and women, often there’s a storyteller, because the person we’re being told of can’t themselves tell the stories. Other times you end up with a character where we can hear their thoughts… Well, that happens most of the time. But sometimes his storytelling takes the shape of a ghost, just observing.

Now, Characters, Erikson loves characters. Short count from the front of the book: 86, all of whom has something to do with the main plot. If you can call it a main plot. The reason why his books are like bricks, is because of his reliance upon the same weave he weaves with plots upon plots, to tell the story he wants to tell. The fall of the Malazan empire.

I loved the first book, and I loved the second book. It’s a book that makes the “autosave” feature some frequent readers experience show its moneys worth. To be able to pick up a book weeks after you discovered that you’d read yourself cross-eyed. It’s a skill that most readers should have. I have it, luckily, and it held true till the end of the book. I’d had a couple of months -long pauses, mostly because I didn’t take the time to read the book.

Now that I’m done, I regret not doing it earlier. It’s just a book, and it was meant to be read.

If you like a world so rich in characters, and their paths, that you may fear stumbling through the first fifty pages, then you will love this book.

As for a “Rating”: There are many scenes where blood and horrible scenery tarnishes the inner eye, I cannot recommend this book to any readers younger than young adult. There are scenes in this book so bad that my Internet-tempered mind flinched in some places. This is a book for adults. I like that there exists fantasy/scifi books for adults.